Even connectivity should have its limits

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As communicators, so much of our jobs consist of creating better and more effective ways to connect people to brands and messaging. Mobile marketing and apps have allowed for a 24/7 connection to just about everything one could need, and sometimes not need. From mobile banking to twitter to calorie facts and even apps about how to grow herbs and vegetables, our smart phones enable us to constantly be entertained and connected to what we find important.

But there comes a time when the present moment is more important than the flashing lights and buzzing of our cell phones. Amidst the multitasking, some activities do require undivided attention. This is especially true when it comes to safety. Today, in honor of the Global Call to End Distracted Driving, we focus on the message of disconnecting.

According to Secretary of Transportation Ray LaHood, “In the US alone, distracted driving resulted in nearly 6,000 deaths and more than half a million injuries in 2008–every one of them completely preventable.”

To give you a better picture, the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration gives this example:

“Drivers who send and receive text messages take their eyes off the road for an average of 4.6 seconds out of every 6 seconds while texting. At 55 miles per hour, this means that the driver is traveling the length of a football field, including the end zones, without looking at the road.”

So next time you’re in the car, on your way to another meeting or driving home, stop and think before you pick up the phone. Even in an age and business that thrives on connectivity, more likely than not the message can wait.

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